Germany, EUROPE

Germany, EUROPE

Things to do - general

Germany is a Western European country with a landscape of forests, rivers, mountain ranges and North Sea beaches. It has over 2 millennia of history. Berlin, its capital, is home to art and nightlife scenes, the Brandenburg Gate and many sites relating to WWII. Munich is known for its Oktoberfest and beer halls, including the 16th-century  Frankfurt, with its skyscrapers, houses the European Central Bank.

Germany’s North Sea islands are blessed with gloriously long beaches and unique natural surroundings. Located in the UNESCO World Heritage Wadden Sea, the islands have a bracing climate that makes them perfect for recreational and active breaks. Fantastic accommodation, top-class cuisine and major sporting events are the icing on the cake.

Country Germany
Visa requirementsVisa in not needed for EU citizens. Everyone else need a visa.
Languages spokenGerman
Currency usedEuro
Area (km2)357,168 km2

Sports & nature

In the classical understanding of environmental policy, environmental communication is commonly considered a persuasive (or informational or appellative) instrument. As a result, its importance is often underestimated and it is classified as a ‘soft’ instrument, although it has a central function in terms of implementation and acceptance of other instruments. This contribution aims to highlight different levels and elements of communication that are particularly relevant in the context of sports and nature conservation. In this article the potential for optimization in this area will be described succinctly in the form of ten theses, supported by both positive and negative examples from a collection of material on this topic. An analytical framework relates the ten theses to different observation levels and phases of the communicative context. Furthermore, potential spaces for developing strategic options for communication in the field of sports and nature conservation that have been neglected until now. Sports in their modern form began, according to Weis and Gugutzer in the mid-nineteenth century [1]. Over time, non-athletic and noncompetitive sports came to be recognized as sports, leading to a general “sportification” of society and everyday life, with sports being not just a product but also a motor of societal individualization processes [2]. Sports thus function as a cross-cultural medium of communication and contribute to the integration of individuals in society, as do few other social fields of action including nature conservation.Sports and nature image

Nightlife info

Berlin is the place to be if you're after an eclectic range of bars. Victoria Bar is well located near Potsdamer Platz and is beautifully decked out in dark wood and leather, as well as playing host to art exhibits. Oh, and it has an extensive cocktail menu. Greenwich Bar has walls lined with fishtanks, Weinerei is a wine bar that operates a pay-what-you-want system for both food and drink, and Green Door is a laidback, retro delight. Munich has a similar range of stylish venues - we recommend Schumann's Bar on Odeonsplatz if you're feeling flush - while Leipzig is better known for its slightly lower key pubs perfect for sampling authentic German beer. Cologne can also be a good choice for more relaxed evenings, especially in the summer as bars and cafes spill out onto the street. Berlin is the place to be if you're after an eclectic range of bars. Victoria Bar is well located near Potsdamer Platz and is beautifully decked out in dark wood and leather, as well as playing host to art exhibits. Oh, and it has an extensive cocktail menu. Greenwich Bar has walls lined with fishtanks, Weinerei is a wine bar that operates a pay-what-you-want system for both food and drink, and Green Door is a laidback, retro delight. Munich has a similar range of stylish venues - we recommend Schumann's Bar on Odeonsplatz if you're feeling flush - while Leipzig is better known for its slightly lower key pubs perfect for sampling authentic German beer. Cologne can also be a good choice for more relaxed evenings, especially in the summer as bars and cafes spill out onto the street.Nightlife image

Culture and history info

Being a federal republic, Germany is very much a decentralised country, which embraces the cultural differences between the regions. Some travellers will perhaps only think of beer, Lederhosen and Oktoberfest when Germany comes to mind, but Germany's famous alpine and beer culture is mostly centered around Bavaria and Munich. Here the beer is traditionally served in 1 litre mugs (normally not in pubs and restaurants, though). The annual Oktoberfest is Europe's most visited festival and the world's largest fair. Germany's south-western regions, however, are well known for their wine growing areas (e.g. Rheinhessen and Palatinate) and Bad Dürkheim on the 'German Wine Route' (Deutsche Weinstraße) organises the biggest wine festival worldwide with over 600,000 visitors annually. The fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 and the subsequent German Reunification are the main events of recent German history. Today most Germans as well as their neighbours support the idea of a peaceful reunified Germany and while the eastern regions still suffer from higher unemployment and of brain drain, the reunification process is overall seen as a success. October 3rd is celebrated as "German Unification Day".Culture and history image

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